SACHIN TENDULKAR complete information

SACHIN TENDULKAR complete information

 

 

SACHIN TENDULKAR

GENERAL INFORMATION

Personal information

Full name        Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar

Born    24 April 1973 (age 45)

Bombay (now Mumbai), Maharashtra

Nickname        God of Cricket, Little Master, Master Blaster

Height 5 ft. 5 in (165 cm)

Batting            Right-handed

Bowling          Right-arm medium, leg break, off break

Role     Batsman

International information

National side

India (1989–2013)

Test debut (cap 187)   15 November 1989 v Pakistan

Last Test         14 November 2013 v West Indies

ODI debut (cap 74)    18 December 1989 v Pakistan

Last ODI         18 March 2012 v Pakistan

ODI shirt no.   10

Only T20I (cap 11)     1 December 2006 v South Africa

Domestic team information

Years   Team

1988    Cricket Club of India

1988–2013      Mumbai

1992    Yorkshire

2008–2013      Mumbai Indians (squad no. 10)

2014    Marylebone Cricket Club

Career statistics

Competition    Test     ODI     FC       LA

Matches           200      463      310      551

Runs scored    15,921 18,426 25,396 21,999

Batting average           53.78   44.83   57.84   45.54

100s/50s          51/68   49/96   81/116 60/114

Top score         248*    200*    248*    200*

Balls bowled   4,240   8,054   7,605   10,230

Wickets           46        154      71        201

Bowling average         54.17   44.48   61.74   42.17

5 wickets in innings    0          2          0          2

10 wickets in match    0          N/A     0          N/A

Best bowling   3/10     5/32     3/10     5/32

Catches/stampings      115/–   140/–   186/–   175/–

Member of Parliament, Raja Sabah (nominated)

Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar born 24 April 1973) is a former Indian international cricketer and a former captain of the Indian national team, regarded as one of the greatest batsmen of all time. He is the highest run scorer of all time in International cricket. Tendulkar took up cricket at the age of eleven, made his Test debut on 15 November 1989 against Pakistan in Karachi at the age of sixteen, and went on to represent Mumbai domestically and India internationally for close to twenty-four years. He is the only player to have scored one hundred international centuries, the first batsman to score a double century in a ODI, the holder of the record for the most number of runs in both Test and ODI, and the only player to complete more than 30,000 runs in international cricket. He is colloquially known as Little Master or Master Blaster, and often referred to as the God of Cricket by Indian cricket followers. Despite his reputation, he is known for his modesty and humility, once stating “I am not the God of cricket. I make mistakes, God doesn’t”.

 

In 2001, Sachin Tendulkar became the first batsman to complete 10,000 ODI runs in his 259 innings. In 2002, halfway through his career, Widen Cricketers’ Almanac ranked him the second greatest Test batsman of all time, behind Don Bradman, and the second greatest ODI batsman of all time, behind Viv Richards. Later in his career, Tendulkar was a part of the Indian team that won the 2011 World Cup, his first win in six World Cup appearances for India. He had previously been named “Player of the Tournament” at the 2003 edition of the tournament, held in South Africa. In 2013, he was the only Indian cricketer included in an all-time Test World XI named to mark the 150th anniversary of Widen Cricketers’ Almanac.

 

Tendulkar received the Arjuna Award in 1994 for his outstanding sporting achievement, the Rajiv Gandhi Keel Rant award in 1997, India’s highest sporting honor, and the Padma Shri and Padma Vibhushan awards in 1999 and 2008, respectively, India’s fourth and second highest civilian awards. After a few hours of his final match on 16 November 2013, the Prime Minister’s Office announced the decision to award him the Bharat Rant, India’s highest civilian award. He is the youngest recipient to date and the first ever sportsperson to receive the award. He also won the 2010 Sir Garfield Sobers Trophy for cricketer of the year at the ICC awards. In 2012, Tendulkar was nominated to the Rajya Sabha, the upper house of the Parliament of India. He was also the first sportsperson and the first person without an aviation background to be awarded the honorary rank of group captain by the Indian Air Force. In 2012, he was named an Honorary Member of the Order of Australia.

 

In 2010, Time magazine included Sachin in its annual Time 100 list as one of the “Most Influential People in the World”. In December 2012, Tendulkar announced his retirement from ODIs. He retired from Twenty20 cricket in October 2013 and subsequently retired from all forms of cricket on 16 November 2013 after playing his 200th Test match, against the West Indies in Mumbai’s Winched Stadium. Tendulkar played 664 international cricket matches in total, scoring 34,357 runs.

 

 

Early years

Tendulkar was born at Nirmal Nursing Home in Dadar, Bombay on 24 April 1973 to a Maharashtrian Rajput Saraswat Brahmin family. His father, Ramesh Tendulkar, was a well-known Marathi novelist & poet and his mother, Rajni, worked in the insurance industry. Ramesh named Tendulkar after his favourite music director, Sachin Dev. Burman. Tendulkar has three elder siblings: two half-brothers Nitin and Ajit, and a half-sister Savita. They were Ramesh’s children by his first wife, who died after the birth of her third child.

 

Tendulkar spent his formative years in the Sahitya Sahawas Cooperative Housing Society in Bandra (East). As a young boy, Tendulkar was considered a bully, and often picked up fights with new children in his school. He also showed an interest in tennis, idolising John McEnroe. To help curb his mischievous and bullying tendencies, Ajit introduced the young Sachin to cricket in 1984. He introduced him to Ramakant Achrekar, a famous cricket coach and a club cricketer of repute, at Shivaji Park, Dadar. In the first meeting, the young Sachin did not play his best. Ajit told Achrekar that he was feeling self-conscious due to the coach observing him, and was not displaying his natural game. Ajit requested the coach to give him another chance at playing, but watch while hiding behind a tree. This time, Sachin, apparently unobserved, played much better and was accepted at Achrekar academy.

 

Ramakant Achrekar was impressed with Tendulkar’s talent and advised him to shift his schooling to Sharadashram Vidyamandir (English) High School, a school at Dadar which had a dominant cricket team and had produced many notable cricketers. Prior to this, Tendulkar had attended the Indian Education Society’s New English School in Bandra (East).  He was also coached under the guidance of Achrekar at Shivaji Park in the mornings and evenings. Tendulkar would practice for hours on end in the nets. If he became exhausted, Achrekar would put a one-rupee coin on the top of the stumps, and the bowler who dismissed Tendulkar would get the coin. If Tendulkar passed the whole session without getting dismissed, the coach would give him the coin. Tendulkar now considers the 13 coins he won then as some of his most prized possessions. He moved in with his aunt and uncle, who lived near Shivaji Park, during this period, due to his hectic schedule.

 

 

Sachin Tendulkar and his wife Anjali

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meanwhile, at school, he developed a reputation as a child prodigy. He had become a common conversation point in local cricketing circles, where there were suggestions already that he would become one of the greats. Sachin consistently featured in the school team in the Matunga Gujarati Seva Mandala (MGSM) Shield. Besides school cricket, he also played club cricket, initially representing John Bright Cricket Club in Bombay’s premier club cricket tournament, the Kanga League, and later went on to play for the Cricket Club of India. In 1987, at the age of 14, he attended the MRF Pace Foundation in Madras (now Chennai) to train as a fast bowler, but Australian fast bowler Dennis Lillee, who took a world record 355 Test wickets, was unimpressed, suggesting that Tendulkar focus on his batting instead. On 20 January 1987, he also turned out as substitute for Imran Khan’s side in an exhibition game at Brabourne Stadium in Bombay, to mark the golden jubilee of Cricket Club of India. A couple of months later, former Indian batsman Sunil Gavaskar gave him a pair of his own ultra-light pads and consoled him to not get disheartened for not getting the Bombay Cricket Association’s “Best junior cricket award” (He was 14 years that time). “It was the greatest source of encouragement for me,” Tendulkar said nearly 20 years later after surpassing Gavaskar’s world record of 34 Test centuries. Sachin served as a ball boy in the 1987 Cricket World Cup when India played against England in the semifinal in Bombay. In his season in 1988, Tendulkar scored a century in every innings he played. He was involved in an unbroken 664-run partnership in a Lord Harris Shield inter-school game against St. Xavier’s High School in 1988 with his friend and teammate Vinod Kambli, who would also go on to represent India. The destructive pair reduced one bowler to tears and made the rest of the opposition unwilling to continue the game. Tendulkar scored 326 (not out) in this innings and scored over a thousand runs in the tournament.[51] This was a record partnership in any form of cricket until 2006, when it was broken by two under-13 batsmen in a match held at Hyderabad in India.

 

Early domestic career

On 14 November 1987, Tendulkar was selected to represent Bombay in the Ranji Trophy, India’s premier domestic First-class cricket tournament, for the 1987–88 season. However, he was not selected for the final eleven in any of the matches, though he was often used as a substitute fielder. He narrowly missed out on playing alongside his idol Gavaskar, who had retired from all forms of cricket after the 1987 Cricket World Cup. A year later, on 11 December 1988, aged 15 years and 232 days, Tendulkar made his debut for Bombay against Gujarat at home and scored 100 not out in that match, making him the youngest Indian to score a century on debut in first-class cricket. He was handpicked to play for the team by the then Bombay captain Dilip Vengsarkar after watching him easily negotiating India’s best fast bowler at the time, Kapil Dev, in the Wankhede Stadium nets, where the Indian team had come to play against the touring New Zealand team. He followed this by scoring a century in his first Deodhar and Dull Trophies, which are also Indian domestic tournaments.

 

Yorkshire

In 1992, at the age of 19, Tendulkar became the first overseas-born player to represent Yorkshire, which prior to Tendulkar joining the team, never selected players even from other English counties. Selected for Yorkshire as a replacement for the injured Australian fast bowler Craig McDermott, Tendulkar played 16 first-class matches for the county and scored 1070 runs at an average of 46.52.

 

International career

Early career

Raj Singh Durgapur is credited for the selection of Tendulkar for the Indian tour of Pakistan in late 1989, after one first class season. The Indian selection committee had shown interest in selecting Tendulkar for the tour of the West Indies held earlier that year, but eventually did not select him, as they did not want him to be exposed to the dominant fast bowlers of the West Indies so early in his career. Tendulkar made his Test debut against Pakistan in Karachi in November 1989 aged 16 years and 205 days. He made 15 runs, being bowled by Waqar Younis, who also made his debut in that match, but was noted for how he handled numerous blows to his body at the hands of the Pakistani pace attack. In the fourth and final Test in Sialkot, he was hit on the nose by a bouncer bowled by Younis, but he declined medical assistance and continued to bat even as he gushed blood from it. In a 20-over exhibition game in Peshawar, held in parallel with the bilateral series, Tendulkar made 53 runs off 18 balls, including an over in which he scored 27 runs (6, 4, 0, 6, 6, 6) off leg-spinner Abdul Qadir. This was later called “one of the best innings I have seen” by the then Indian captain Krishnamachari Srikkanth. In all, he scored 215 runs at an average of 35.83 in the Test series, and was dismissed without scoring a run in the only One Day International (ODI) he played. Thus Sachin Tendulkar became the youngest player to debut for India in Tests at the age of 16 years and 205 days and also the youngest player to debut for India in ODIs at the age of 16 years and 238 days.

 

The series was followed by a tour of New Zealand in which he scored 117 runs at an average of 29.25 in Tests including an innings of 88 in the second Test. He was dismissed without scoring in one of the two one-day games he played, and scored 36 in the other. On his next tour, a summer tour to England of 1990, on 14 August, he became the second youngest cricketer to score a Test century as he made 119 not out in the second Test at Old Trafford in Manchester, an innings which contributed to a draw and saved India from certain defeat in the match. Wisden described his innings as “a disciplined display of immense maturity” and also wrote:

 

He looked the embodiment of India’s famous opener, Gavaskar, and indeed was wearing a pair of his pads. While he displayed a full repertoire of strokes in compiling his maiden Test hundred, most remarkable were his off-side shots from the back foot. Though only 5ft 5in tall, he was still able to control without difficulty short deliveries from the English pacemen.

 

Tendulkar further enhanced his reputation as a future great during the 1991–92 tour of Australia held before the 1992 Cricket World Cup, that included an unbeaten 148 in the third Test at Sydney, making him the youngest batsman to score a century in Australia. He then scored 114 on a fast, bouncing pitch in the final Test at Perth against a pace attack comprising Merv Hughes, Bruce Reid and Craig McDermott. Hughes commented to Allan Border at the time that “This little prick’s going to get more runs than you, AB.”

 

Rise through the ranks

Tendulkar’s performance through the years 1994–1999 coincided with his physical peak, in his early twenties. He opened the batting at Auckland against New Zealand in 1994, making 82 runs off 49 balls. He scored his first ODI century on 9 September 1994 against Australia in Sri Lanka at Colombo. It took him 78 ODIs to score his first century.

 

 

Tendulkar waits at the bowler’s end.

Tendulkar’s rise continued when he was the leading run scorer at the 1996 World Cup, scoring two centuries. He was the only Indian batsman to perform well in the semi-final against Sri Lanka. Tendulkar fell amid a batting collapse and the match referee, Clive Lloyd, awarded Sri Lanka the match after the crowd began rioting and throwing litter onto the field.

 

This was the beginning of a period at the top of the batting world, culminating in the Australian tour of India in early 1998, with Tendulkar scoring three consecutive centuries. The focus was on the clash between Tendulkar, the world’s most dominating batsman and Shane Warne, the world’s leading spinner, both at the peak of their careers, clashing in a Test series.[citation needed] In the lead-up to the series, Tendulkar simulated scenarios in the nets with Laxman Sivaramakrishnan, the former India leg spinner, donning the role of Warne.[citation needed] In their tour opener, Australia faced the then Ranji Champions Mumbai at the Brabourne Stadium in a three-day first class match. Tendulkar made an unbeaten 204 as Shane Warne conceded 111 runs in 16 overs and Australia lost the match within three days. He also had a role with the ball in the five-match ODI series in India following the Tests, including a five wicket haul in an ODI in Kochi. Set 310 runs to win, Australia were cruising at 203 for 3 in the 31st over when Tendulkar turned the match for India, taking the wickets of Michael Bevan, Steve Waugh, Darren Lehmann, Tom Moody and Damien Martyn for 32 runs in 10 overs. The Test match success was followed by two consecutive centuries in April 1998 in a Triangular cricket tournament in Sharjah – the first in a must-win game to take India to the finals and then again in the finals, both against Australia. These twin knocks were also known as the Desert Storm innings. Following the series, Warne ruefully joked that he was having nightmares about his Indian nemesis.

 

Tendulkar’s contribution in the ICC 1998 quarterfinal at Dhaka paved the way for India’s entry into the semifinals, when he took four Australian wickets after scoring 141 runs in 128 balls.

 

The inaugural Asian Test Championship took place in February and March 1999, involving India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. In the first match, between India and Pakistan in Eden Gardens, Tendulkar was run out for nine after colliding with Pakistan bowler Shoaib Akhtar. Around 100,000 people came to support India during the initial four days of the tournament, breaking a 63-year-old record for aggregate Test attendance record. The crowd’s reaction to Tendulkar’s dismissal was to throw objects at Akhtar, and the players were taken off the field. The match resumed after Tendulkar and the president of the ICC appealed to the crowd; however, further rioting meant that the match was finished in front of a crowd of 200 people. Tendulkar scored his 19th Test century in the second Test and the match resulted in a draw with Sri Lanka. India did not progress to the final, which was won by Pakistan, and refused to participate the next time the championship was held due to increasing political tensions between India and Pakistan.

 

 

Injuries and decline amid surpassing Bradman’s haul

Sachin Tendulkar continued performing well in Test cricket in 2001 and 2002, with some pivotal performances with both bat and ball. Tendulkar took three wickets on the final day of the famous Kolkata Test against Australia in 2001. Tendulkar took the key wickets of Matthew Hayden and Adam Gilchrist, who were centurions in the previous Test. He also take a wicket of Shane Warne. This three wicket change the result of test match from draw to win of India. In the five-match ODI series that followed, he took his 100th wicket in ODIs, claiming the wicket of then Australian captain Steve Waugh in the final match at the Fatorda Stadium in Goa.

 

In the 2002 series in the West Indies, Tendulkar started well, scoring 79 in the first Test. In the second Test at Port of Spain, Sachin Tendulkar scored 117 in the first innings, his 29th Test century in his 93rd Test match, to equal Sir Donald Bradman’s record of 29 Test hundreds. He was awarded by Sports car “Ferrari” by Michael Schumacher for achieving this feat.

 

Decline phase of career

Then, in a hitherto unprecedented sequence, he scored 0, 0, 8 and 0 in the next four innings. He returned to form in the last Test scoring 41 and 86, one half century. However, India lost the series. In this period, in the third Test match against England in August 2002, Sachin scored his 30th Test century to surpass Bradman’s haul, in his 99th Test match.

 

2003 Cricket World Cup

Tendulkar made 673 runs in 11 matches in the 2003 Cricket World Cup, helping India reach the final. While Australia retained the trophy that they had won in 1999, Tendulkar was given the Man of the Tournament award.

 

He continued to score heavily in ODI cricket that year, with two hundreds in a tri-series involving New Zealand and Australia. As a part-time bowler, he dismissed an exhausted centurion, Matthew Hayden in the tri-series final.

 

2003 Tour of Australia

The drawn series as India toured Australia in 2003–04 saw Tendulkar making his mark in the last Test of the series, with 241 not out from 436 ball by 33 four at strike rate of 55.27 in Sydney, putting India in a virtually unbeatable position. He spend 613 minute at crease. India have a first inning score of 705/7. He followed up the innings with an unbeaten 60 in the second innings of the Test. Prior to this Test match, he had had an unusually horrible run of form, failing in all six innings in the preceding three Tests. It was no aberration that 2003 was his worst year in Test cricket, with an average of 17.25 and just one fifty.

 

Tendulkar scored an unbeaten 194 against Pakistan at Multan in the following series. Indian captain Rahul David declared before Tendulkar reached 200; had he done so it would have been the fourth time he had passed the landmark in Tests. Tendulkar said that he was disappointed and that the declaration had taken him by surprise. Many former cricketers commented that David’s declaration was in bad taste.[134][135] After the match, which India won, David said that the matter had been discussed internally and put to rest.

 

A tennis elbow injury then took its toll on Tendulkar, leaving him out of the side for most of the year, coming back only for the last two Tests when Australia toured India in 2004. He played a part in India’s victory in Mumbai in that series with a fast 55, though Australia took the series 2–1.

 

Tendulkar’s comeback came in the DLF cup in Malaysia and he was the only Indian batsman to shine. In his comeback match, against West Indies on 14 September 2006, Tendulkar responded to his critics who believed that his career was inexorably sliding with his 40th ODI century.[citation needed] Though he scored 141 not out, West Indies won the rain-affected match by the D/L method.

 

2007 Cricket World Cup

During the preparation for the 2007 World Cup, Tendulkar’s attitude was criticized by Indian team coach Greg Chappell. Chappell reportedly felt that Tendulkar would be more useful down the order, while the latter felt that he would be better off opening the innings, the role he had played for most of his career. Chappell also believed that Tendulkar’s repeated failures were hurting the team’s chances. In a rare show of emotion, Tendulkar hit out at the comments attributed to Chappell by pointing out that no coach had ever suggested his attitude towards cricket was incorrect. On 7 April 2007, the Board of Control for Cricket in India issued a notice to Tendulkar asking for an explanation for his comments made to the media. Chappell subsequently resigned as coach but said that this affair had no bearing on his decision and that he and Tendulkar were on good terms.

 

At the World Cup in the West Indies, Tendulkar and the Indian cricket team led by Rahul David had a dismal campaign. Tendulkar, who was pushed to bat lower down the order had scores of 7 against Bangladesh, 57 not out against Bermuda and 0 against Sri Lana’s a result, former Australian captain Ian Chappell, brother of Greg, called for Tendulkar to retire in his newspaper column.

 

Return to old form and consistency

In the subsequent Test series against Bangladesh, Tendulkar returned to his opening slot and was chosen as the Man of the Series. He continued by scoring 99 and 93 in the first two matches of the Future Cup against South Africa. During the second match, he also became the first to score 15,000 runs in ODIs.

 

 

Tendulkar celebrates upon reaching his 38th Test century against Australia in the 2nd Test at the SCG in 2008, where he finished not out on 154

On the second day of the Nottingham Test on 28 July 2007, Tendulkar became the third cricketer to complete 11,000 Test runs. In the subsequent one-day series against England, Tendulkar was the leading run scorer from India with an average of 53.42. In the ODI Series against Australia in October 2007 Tendulkar was the leading Indian run scorer with 278 runs.

 

2007–08 tour of Australia

In the Border-Gavaskar Trophy, 2007–08, Tendulkar showed exceptional form, becoming the leading run scorer with 493 runs in four Tests, despite consistently failing in the second innings. Sachin scored 62 runs in the first innings of the first Test at the MCG in Melbourne, but could not prevent a heavy 337-run win for Australia. In the controversial New Years’ Test at Sydney, Tendulkar scored an unbeaten 154, even though India lost the Test. This was his third century at the SCG and his 38th Test century overall, earning him an average of 326 at the ground at the time of completing the innings. In the third Test at the WACA cricket ground in Perth, Sachin was instrumental in India’s first innings score of 330, scoring a well-compiled 71. India went on to record a historic triumph at the WACA, ending Australia’s run of 16 consecutive wins. In the fourth Test at the Adelaide Oval, which ended in a draw, he scored 153 in the first innings, being involved in a crucial 126 run stand with V.V.S. Laxman for the fifth wicket to lead India to a score of 282 for 5 from 156 for 4. He secured the Man of the Match award.

 

Sachin Tendulkar’s Test cricket record

Matches           Runs    Best     Average           100s     50s

Home  94        7216    217      52.67   22        32

Away  106      8705    248*    54.74   29        36

South Africa toured in March and April 2008 for a three-Test series. Tendulkar scored a five-ball duck in his only innings of the series; he sustained a groin strain in the match and as a result was forced not only to miss the second and third Tests, but also the tri-series involving Bangladesh, the 2008 Asia Cup, and the first half of the inaugural season of the IPL.

 

Sri Lanka Series

Before the Indian cricket team’s tour of Sri Lanka in July 2008, Tendulkar needed 177 runs to go past Brian Lara’s record of Test 11,953 runs. However, he failed in all six innings, scoring a total of 95 runs. India lost the series and his average of 15.83 was his worst in a Test series with at least three matches.

 

Return to form and breaking Brian Lara’s record

In the following ODI series against Sri Lanka, Tendulkar was sidelined due to injury. However, during the following Australia tour of India, he returned to fitness and form, scoring 13 and 49 in the first Test before making 88 in the first innings of the second Test, breaking the record for most number of Test runs held by Brian Lara. He also reached the 12,000 run mark when he was on 61. He described the achievement as the biggest in 19 years of his career on the day he achieved the record. He made a fifty in the third Test and 109 in the fourth, as India won the series 2–0 and regained the Border-Gavaskar Trophy.

 

ODI and Test Series against England

Tendulkar was again out of the first three ODIs of a seven-match ODI series at home against England due to an injury, but he made 11 in the fourth ODI and 50 in the fifth, before the series was called off due to the 2008 Mumbai terrorist attacks, the score line being 5–0 to India.

 

 

2009–2010

See also: List of highest individual scores in ODIs

In early 2009, India revisited Sri Lanka for five ODIs, as the Pakistan series had been cancelled due to the security situation in Pakistan and the attacks in Mumbai.[citation needed] Tendulkar scored 5, 6 and 7 in the first three matches, being dismissed leg before wicket in all of them, and did not play in the remaining two matches.

 

India’s next assignment was an away series against New Zealand, consisting of three Tests and five ODIs. In the ODI series, Tendulkar made an unbeaten 163 in the third match before stomach cramps forced him to end his innings. India made 392, won the match and eventually won the series 3–1. Tendulkar made 160 in the first Test, his 42nd Test century, and India won. He made 49 and 64 in the second Test and 62 and 9 in the third, in which play was halted on the last day due to rain with India needing only two wickets to win. India won the series 1–0.

 

2011 World Cup and after

From February to April, Bangladesh, India, and Sri Lanka hosted the 2011 World Cup. Amassing 482 runs at an average of 53.55 including two centuries, Tendulkar was India’s leading run-scorer for the tournament; only Tillakaratne Dilshan of Sri Lanka scored more runs in the 2011 tournament. India defeated Sri Lanka in the final. Shortly after the victory, Tendulkar commented that “Winning the World Cup is the proudest moment of my life. … I couldn’t control my tears of joy.”

 

Tendulkar’s results in international matches

Matches           Won    Lost     Drawn Tied     No result

Test     200      72        56        72        0          –

ODI     463      234      200      –          5          24

T20I    1          1          –          –          –          –

India were due to tour the West Indies in June, although Tendulkar chose not to participate. He returned to the squad in July for India’s tour of England. Throughout the tour there was much hype in the media about whether Tendulkar would reach his 100th century in international cricket (Test and ODIs combined). However his highest score in the Tests was 91; Tendulkar averaged 34.12 in the series as England won 4–0 as they deposed India as the No. 1 ranked Test side. The injury Tendulkar sustained to his right foot in 2001 flared up and as a result he was ruled out of the ODI series that followed. Tendulkar created another record on 8 November 2011 when he became the first cricketer to score 15,000 runs in Test cricket, during the opening Test match against the West Indies at the Feroz Shah Kotla Stadium in New Delhi.

 

 

100th international century

Tendulkar scored his 100th international hundred on 16 March 2012, at Mirpur against Bangladesh in the Asia Cup. He became the first person in history to achieve this feat, which was also his first ODI hundred against Bangladesh. He said “It’s been a tough phase for me … I was not thinking about the milestone, the media started all this, wherever I went, the restaurant, room service, and everyone was talking about the 100th hundred. Nobody talked about my 99 hundreds. It became mentally tough for me because nobody talked about my 99 hundreds.”[243] Despite Tendulkar’s century, India failed to win the match against Bangladesh, losing by 5 wickets.

Return to Ranji Trophy

After being bowled out in three similar instances against New Zealand and hitting a slump in form, Tendulkar returned to the Ranji Trophy to get back some form ahead of the England Series at home,[citation needed] in a match for Mumbai against Railways on 2 November 2012. This was his first Ranji Trophy match since 2009. He scored 137 off 136 balls, with 21 fours and 3 sixes, to take his team to 344 for 4 at stumps on day one.

 

 

Retirement

 

Sachin fielding at 199th Test match in Eden Gardens (he is seen wearing a hat)

Further information on 200th and final Test match: West Indian cricket team in India in 2013–14

Following poor performance in the 2012 series against England, Tendulkar announced his retirement from One Day Internationals on 23 December 2012, while noting that he will be available for Test cricket. In response to the news, former India captain Sourav Ganguly noted that Tendulkar could have played the up-coming series against Pakistan, while Anil Kumble said it would be “tough to see an Indian (ODI) team list without Tendulkar’s name in it”, and Javagal Srinath mentioned that Tendulkar “changed the way ODIs were played right from the time he opened in New Zealand in 1994”.

 

After playing a Twenty20 International in 2006 against South Africa, he said that he would not play the format again. He announced his retirement from the IPL after his team, Mumbai Indians, beat Chennai Super Kings by 23 runs at the Eden Gardens in Kolkata on 26 May to win the Indian Premier League 2013. He retired from Twenty20 cricket and limited-overs cricket, after playing the 2013 Champions League Twenty20 in September–October 2013 in India for Mumbai Indians.

Achievements and awards

Main articles: Achievements of Sachin Tendulkar and List of ODI Awards for Sachin Tendulkar

See also: Player of the Match awards (cricket)

 

Tendulkar’s Wax Statue in Madame Tussauds, London

Centuries against different nations

Test     ODI

Australia         11        9

Sri Lanka        9          8

South Africa  7          5

England          7          2

New Zealand 4          5

West Indies    3          4

Zimbabwe      3          5

Pakistan          2          5

Bangladesh    5          1

Kenya NA      4

Namibia          NA      1

Sachin Tendulkar is the leading run scorer in Tests, with 15,921 runs, as well as in One-Day Internationals, with 18,426 runs. He is the only player to score more than 30,000 runs in all forms of international cricket (Tests, ODIs and Twenty20 Internationals). He is the 16th player and the first Indian to score 50,000 runs in all forms of domestic and international recognized cricket (First-class, List A and Twenty20). He achieved this feat on 5 October 2013, during a Champions League Twenty20 match for his IPL team Mumbai Indians against Trinidad and Tobago.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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SACHIN TENDULKAR OVERALL STATS

BATTING & FIELDING PERFORMANCE

M         I           N/O     R         HS       100s     50s       4s         6s         Avg     S/R      Ct        St

Test     200      329      33        15921  248* v BAN   51        68        2058    69        53.78   –           115      0

ODI     463      452      41        18426  200* v SA       49        96        2016    195      44.83   86.23   140      0

World Cup      45        44        4          2278    152 v NAM     6          15        241      27        56.95   88.98   12        0

T20I    1          1          0          10        10 v SA           0          0          2          0          10.00   83.33   1          0

IPL      78        78        11        2334    100* v KOC   1          13        295      29        34.83   119.81 23        0

CL       13        13        0          265      69 v HL           0          1          34        4          20.38   109.05 3          0

BOWLING PERFORMANCE

I           O         M         R         W        Best     3w       5w       Avg     E/R      S/R

Test     145      706.4   83        2492    46        3/10 v SA        2          0          54.17   3.52     92.17

ODI     270      1342.2 24        6850    154      5/32 v AUS     8          2          44.48   5.10     52.29

World Cup      25        120      1          539      8          2/28 v KEN     0          0          67.37   4.49     90.00

T20I    1          2.3       0          12        1          1/12 v SA        0          0          12.00   4.80     15.00

IPL      4          6          0          58        0          0/7 v KXIP     0          0          –           9.66     –

CL       0          0          0          0          0          0          0          0          0          0          0

 

While a game is always bigger than a player, a lot of people will agree that Sachin Tendulkar was the closest thing to threatening that maxim, at least in India where he enjoyed an unprecedented following. His talent and achievements consistent over more than two decades made him a giant of a player, and even years after quitting the game he remains India’s favourite son.

 

 

A child prodigy, Tendulkar made his Test debut at the age of 16 in 1989 against Pakistan. Later on his first tours of England and Australia with the national team he got a few centuries and stellar cricket pundits from both countries concurred that a batting genius was born.

 

 

Over the next two decades, almost every record was smashed by the man who could play in any situation; who could drop anchor or weigh anchor with equal dexterity. In 2012, he became the first player to score 100 international tons besides being miles ahead in terms of runs scored in Tests and ODIs. He was also the first player to break the double-hundred barrier in ODIs in 2008 when he achieved the unthinkable in Gwalior against South Africa.

 

 

Tendulkar’s contribution goes beyond runs and artistry. He didn’t just pile up those runs, he also helped others around him improve their game and contribute in a big way, especially abroad. Consequently post mid-90s, India produced a slew of master batsmen, and while their own talent was undeniable, harnessing in many ways was done by Tendulkar. He retired from international cricket in 2013 and hours after his last game was conferred the highest civilian award in India, the Bharat Ratna, a first for a sportsperson. The 2011 World Cup winner continues to be involved with cricket in one way or another.

 

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